A Different Shade of Blue

36 comments


Hexadecimal colour code #001642. A slightly darker shade to Royal Blue (#002366), wouldn’t you know.

Royal Blue, the colour, was created / blended / discovered in Somerset, England, after a nationwide challenge by King George III for clothiers from all over the kingdom to come up with a suitable colour fit for royalty, and in particular his wife, Queen Charlotte. A kind of X Factor search of the time. The colour was blended, robes were sewn, and a further part of history was made.

This particular King and Queen, crowned as it happens on September 22nd 1761, had only met each other a couple of weeks before, actually on their wedding day. In 1762, King George bought the Queen a new home, Buckingham House in London, which was known at the time as the Queen’s House. Today, it’s Buckingham Palace.

The couple had a very successful marriage with many children, but the King had a fair few challenges himself to deal with during his reign. Little things, such as the American Declaration of Independence from the British Empire on July 4th 1776; a war with France in 1789; and, in 1812, the assassination of Spencer Perceval, the only British Prime Minister to suffer such a fate. George also suffered toward the end of his life with mental illness, to such an extent that he didn’t know that his wife had died in 1818. George himself passed away in Windsor Castle in 1820.

George and Charlotte’s eldest daughter, also Charlotte, was Princess Royal from 1789-1828, and their great granddaughter, Princess Victoria, took over the style in 1841. Her mother (and their granddaughter), also Victoria, had been Queen for about four years at the time.

The Princess Royal title began back in 1642. Not that the Princess Royal title has anything whatsoever to do with the Royal Blue colour, but through the intrinsic web of historical links, they are connected.

Maybe that’s where the term ‘blue blood’ comes from. Royal Blue, that is, and not the Hexadecimal interpretation of it… Having said that, the Royal Blue colour has nothing to do with hex code 001642 either…

However, the coincidental links are there again. Sideview’s weekend theme this week is Blue, 001642 is a shade of blue, the Princess Royal began in 1642, and a coronation took place just over 250 years ago yesterday for the royals who introduced a different shade of blue.

In Somerset, of all places, which just happens to be the county I chose to border Cheshire in my recent ‘Road to Meringue’ series…

My 1642 quest will continue.

36 comments on “A Different Shade of Blue”

    1. Thanks, Prenin, and although I’d love to take the credit, it’s the internet with the knowledge, and not me… I just found the snippets I was looking for! I never knew about the origins of Royal Blue before yesterday… I didn’t even know that we’d had a Queen Charlotte!
      I do like looking for these things though… it’s amazing what you find!

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  1. What colors shall you wear when you become a famous author??? Better start thinking about that 🙂 Funny, blue is my least favorite color….Thanks for the info! VK

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      1. OH! I can’t believe I missed that (in my defense I was reading early this morning before my coffee). It is glorious! I think this blabel thing is starting to stick 🙂

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  2. Wow what a fascinating bit of history! I love learning about the history of the kings and queens of england. My mom is from England and through the family tree it was discovered that Sir Thomas Wyatt is linked to us through ancestory, I forgot in what way though, so after I read about him I became interested to read about Anne Boleyn and my interest just sort of stemmed from that.
    You could be right about where the term bluebloods and royal blue came from. I had heard a theory on that…probably from my mother, that the term bluebloods came from the fact that long ago sometimes royals married each other…I mean related, as in cousins or maybe even closer in blood relations, so because of that sometimes children born of those unions were ill and born ‘blue’ and in need of blood transfusion. Now this is in no way meant to be taken as factual, cuz I dont know if its factual or not, probably more a silly fable but who knows.
    Have a great day Tom
    Nikki x

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    1. Hi Nikki, I find history fascinating myself, but I’m learning when I look up the facts for these posts – it’s all fun though! And regarding the blue blood theory you may be right… it seems valid. Maybe further facts about this will be revealed in my future visits to times gone by!
      Hope you’ve had a good Monday!

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  3. Just about all the history I know, I learned through Art History. Dates are really hard to memorize, but my brain sure can hold on to art-related data. So this post is especially appreciated. That said, I love the overall format of your blog – especially some of the sidebar widgets – and the random insights it provides.

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    1. Hi Gabriel! Thanks for commenting!
      I don’t know a lot about history, and in the posts I write about it I learn something new every time… some facts I remember more than others as well!
      I’m always fiddling with the widgets and appearance of the blog… and I do get very random occasionally – just to keep things different!
      Hope you’ve had / are having a good Monday!

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    1. …see what I mean? 😉 I knew you knew!
      The smallest details can reveal the best facts sometimes! I never knew of the origins of royal blue until I posted this. I didn’t even think there was an origin!

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      1. Hmm…seems like your Mansion’s portal scrambles my Icewolf brain cell!
        Neither did I 🙂 Royal blue was just…well…royal blue…but now 😉 now it has taken on a whole new meaning!

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