Melusine is a fresh water spirit from legends in France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Belgium and Cyprus. She is sometimes seen with wings, one fish tail or two. She was a fairy queen who had to take on the part serpent form every Saturday. She was a hard-working soul, building many castles each and every night throughout the night, and with her human husband had many children. The unfortunate thing was that all of these children had some sort of odd defect, one with different coloured eyes (red and blue), another with one ear larger than the other, one filled with murderous rage and others. She never wanted her husband to see her on a Saturday, which he agreed to, but one day he did. He thought it was because of her serpent side that all of the children were as they were. Devastated that her husband had gone against her wishes and saw her in her Saturday form, she turned into a huge serpent and eventually flew away… visiting her children at night and leaving her husband. He was never happy again.

The legend continues as it is said her descendants became some of the region’s great leaders, including Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen consort of France and England.

And she is still seen today – if you notice the Starbucks logo… that’s her on the image.

My ATC, another very quick one so not much time for great detail, shows her in her one-tail form, flying out of a fresh water lake. She was created using pastels, gel pens and gold and silver markers, as all of the others have been in this series. I think the image looks better on the actual ATC than it does in the photographs, as the glitter in the gel is reflecting back the light of the flash, and this isn’t as noticeable on the 2.5 X 3.5 inch picture.


 

Posted by Tom Merriman

A future writer living in the present day

19 Comments

  1. What an interesting and unusual name. Poor Melusine , poor husband …

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    1. She’s French, so has a French accent with her name’s pronunciation, which adds to her magic.
      But yes, Raili… a lot of these legends are quite sad or troubled, aren’t they?

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      1. Makes you wonder about the origins. Lost in the annals of history, I guess.

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        1. Buried and added to, I would say, Raili.

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  2. Now this is a strange one. But then some things are strange. You seem to be on a roll this weekend.Good going! I did get a card or two made and messed around with the pricing excel page. Not as productive as you I’m afraid.

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    1. Anything is always a step forward, Beverly. I went for it this last weekend, as I knew time was going to be of the essence again during the week!
      But yes… Melusine is strange, but, I feel, one of the nicer ones – all things considered…

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  3. A tale of woe. Well done.

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    1. Thanks, Eugenia.
      A lot of these legends appear to be woeful, don’t they?

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      1. Yes, and yet very intriguing.

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  4. I do like what you have done there.
    I am viewing it while listening to the Mendelsohn overture ‘The Fair Melusina’. What else?

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    1. By choice, chance or coincidence, Col? An excellent choice for viewing this post, however! I never even knew that piece of music existed until your comment. I quite like it!

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      1. By choice – the name rang a bell and I was pleased that I traced that peal to its source. The piece of music has a lot of moods, structure and depth, as can be expected from Mendelssohn. If one looks at the opening notes of his Italian Symphony, for example, the main theme that follows is using the same notes with a different rhythm and some repetitions. Things like that give coherence — and magic.

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        1. When I listened to it, I thought it sounded like a soundtrack score to a movie or dramatic TV show… and yes, there was magic in there. Pleased you could follow the thread fom beginning to end there! 😀

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  5. Fascinating! 🙂

    You certainly entertain and inform Tom!

    Good picture too!!! 🙂

    God Bless!

    Prenin.

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    1. Thanks, Prenin. I’m enjoying this series… I like learning about ‘new’ legends!

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  6. Beautiful Tom. I’m really impressed with her wings. All the feathers are so uniform and ‘right’. Well done. Great ATC.
    ~ Cobs. 😀

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    1. Thanks, Cobs. I wanted her wings to have similar colours to the phoenix’s wings, but a slightly different look.

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